Category Archives: Asia Pacific

Meiji Inspired Diplomacy and Politics for Japan’s Future

Facing numerous social and economic challenges, Japan in the twenty-first century faces uncertainty similar to that of the Meiji Era. Scott Harrison finds significant similarities between the two periods, and argues that Meiji style diplomacy, characterized by engagement with the external world and the development of alliances—particularly with the dominant or hegemonic powers of the time, are vital parts of protecting national interests. Without such outreach and global integration, he suggests, Japan’s domestic issues and international priorities will be much harder to address. Not only should countries and businesses around the world pay attention to how Japan addresses its contemporary challenges, but also, as the Meiji Era has shown, Japan may find many of the solutions to its issues from lessons learned around the world.

Click here for this chapter and the book: “Meiji Inspired Diplomacy and Politics for Japan’s Future.” In Japan’s Future and a New Meiji Transformation: International Reflections. Ken S. Coates, et al., eds. London: Routledge, 2019.

Canadian Provinces and Foreign Policy in Asia

Non-central governments in Canada have become increasingly active on the world stage, most notably in the Asia Pacific region. The scholarly works on Canada’s foreign policy in Asia tend to focus either on the federal government as the main actor, or on the “other diplomacies” of non-governmental actors; little attention has been paid to the increasing role of non-central governments in Asia. This article, therefore, contributes to the discussion by documenting and evaluating Canadian provinces’ international activities in the Asia Pacific. It also situates these activities within Canada’s foreign policy in the region, and assesses how important provinces have become in Canada–Asia relations. This paper first reviews the literature on non-central governments and foreign policy to expose the key forces pushing and pulling Canadian provinces to be increasingly active internationally. It then details the provinces’ international activities in Asia, and locates them within Canada’s foreign policy in the region. Click here for the full length article: “Canadian Provinces and Foreign Policy in Asia.” International Journal Vol.73, No.3 (2018): 429-448. Co-author with Charles Labrecque.

Connecting Indigenous People in Canada to Opportunities in Asia

Pacific Partnerships: Connecting Indigenous People in Canada to Opportunities in Asia

In the lead up to the Nation 2 Nation Forum, held in Vancouver on March 30, 2017, BC Assembly of First Nations Acting Regional Chief Maureen Chapman stated: “As the economic importance of the Asia Pacific grows, B.C. First Nations face significant opportunities for economic development partnerships.” Continue reading

The Asia Factor in Atlantic Canada

The Asia Pacific Foundation of Canada released “The Asia Factor in Atlantic Canada” project reports in April 2016 at an interactive roundtable in Halifax. This series of eight reports, available in English and French, focus on current and future opportunities and challenges for Atlantic Canadian companies’ engagement with Asian markets.

Asia Beckons

Ghost co-author to this editorial in the January 2016 issue of the Institute of Corporate Director’s Director Journal. It argues that:

“Boards must add Asian experience to capitalize on new global opportunities.

“‘Asia is not just the future, but the present’ is a refrain often heard but, regrettably, seldom acted upon by Canadian businesses. As a commodity-based economy, our approach to Asia has historically been driven by input demand and global prices. This approach needs to change. By 2030, Asia is projected to represent between 45 and 50 percent of the world’s GDP. With approximately 4.5 billion people expected to be living in the Asia Pacific by 2030, the region also will be home to 66 percent of the world’s middle class. The Canadian opportunity goes well beyond the demand for resources and we need to be prepared to better engage with the region. …”

Read the article…

The Indigenous Factor of East Asian Engagement with the Canadian Arctic

In the Arctic, as elsewhere, there are multiple ways of understanding borders. These multiplicities of understanding shape the values, goals and subsequent policy-making initiatives of concerned parties. Focusing on any one set of borders will lead to different perspectives, analysis and ways of understanding the Arctic, which will invariably shape engagement strategies across borders. Continue reading